87 Responses

  1. Nate Wright

    This is the best breakdown of costing I’ve read related to the kind of client-work I do (small-to-medium). I’d love to hear what others in the industry think about the cost estimates you’ve indicated. I’ve undercharged for years and only recently started trying to correct my cost estimates.

    Often the social costs (project management) of small jobs equals or exceeds the technical costs, because the client is too invested or not invested enough, or just needs a lot of hand-holding. I give huge discounts to a couple clients that I’ve worked with in the past, because I know when I deliver something they’ll say “great” and go with it and I won’t hear from them until they really need something.

    One of the biggest client multipliers for me is feature creep. If the client has a new feature request with each new discovery conversation, that suggests to me that they’re only really thinking about the project when we talk. That feature creep is not likely to stop as the project goes forward.

    Another big one is one-line answers to complex questions. If I’m asking a complex early-stage question about strategy and I get a one-line answer, from experience I know that they’re only really going to start investing in the project when they start to see the result (ie – once I’ve done all the work). That makes for a lot of headaches late in the game.

  2. Karlo

    Great article,
    I wish that all our clients can read this before contacting us. Pricing is hard and you are right about that. In last couple of years there are so many developers and freelancers and getting even near prices you have written here is almost impossible.

  3. Bradley Davis

    Great article Brian! A lot of great takeaways for a range of different web workers, it has definitely given me a few points on how to structure pricing for my next project.

  4. Mark Gavalda (@MarkGavalda)

    This is by far the best article I’ve ever read on this topic. Great, great job Brian! The only thing I would add from my experience (8+ years of building mostly WP based sites): don’t be afraid to ask the price that you deserve. Clients will respect you more, and you’ll have a whole different clientele to start with. Those with bigger budgets are usually “easier” clients, they hire you for a lot of money because they don’t want to deal with the details. Cheap clients will have all the time on their hands (because their business isn’t going well, that’s why they can’t afford realistic prices) and will try to control your every move. Oh and more often than not they’ll want to teach you how you should do your job too! :) So yeah, do yourself a favor and ask 1,5x-2x the original price you had in your mind when you thought “I should really get this job, it would be awesome…”!

  5. Dan Knauss (@newlocalmedia)

    Totally accurate in every respect. I’m going to link to it and use it in future correspondence. It might be on the long side for them to actually read, but if they do it will help me qualify them and help them orient themselves and their expectations.

    1. Dan Knauss (@newlocalmedia)

      (I meant I’ll use this in future correspondence with prospective clients.)

  6. Brad Morrison

    This is a fantastic post Brian! I love the client multiplier and wish we had applied that on some of our projects. Thanks for sharing!

  7. Lucas Karpiuk (@karpstrucking)

    Brian, thank you for this, it’s a great article – and like others have commented, I plan to make this required reading for all future freelance prospects.

    The points about client multipliers and pre-made themes were especially poignant.

    @MarkGavalda Your comment completely echos my experience with agency projects over the last several years.

  8. CFX

    Awesome post Brian. Very detailed and well executed.

    I personally place myself in the Excellent freelancer category and I’m continually striving to improve.

    What’s been helpful for me in my estimates and quotes has been the approach you discuss with Unique Views along with keeping track of how long I spend on each one. I break down each Unique View into two phases: (1) scaffolding (creating the template files and any backend customizations they require); and (2) styling.

    Currently I estimate my time at 4.5 hours to scaffold a unique view and 3 hours to style a unique view at 3 responsive breakpoints. I don’t always keep these numbers the same for each project, but these are my starting points and they can fluctuate up or down depending on the other myriad of details you touched on.

    It usually does not take me 4.5 hours to scaffold a contact page, but if a custom post type has multiple custom taxonomies that need custom search functionality then my time spent tends to even out.

    In general though, I feel like most freelancers spend too much time contemplating how much to charge or how to breakdown their quotes. It’s an important part of the business, but if you’re not consistently approaching the *right* clients for you then you won’t have much contemplating or breaking down to do in the first place.

    Happy coding!

  9. Alex Vasquez

    Just. Wow. Amazing and well-written! Here’s the mic you just dropped! =)

  10. Jim Peake

    All of this is so spot on, thanks for articulating. The challenge is many clients are “unsophisticated” when buying our types of web services. I think the key to success is setting their expectations properly and letting them know if they want their project to come out well someone is going to have to pay close attention to it and in order to do this it costs $$$. ;-)

  11. Jenny Stradling

    One of my biggest pet peeves is when a client asks “How much does it cost to build a website?”. That’s like calling a contractor and asking them “How much does it cost to build a house?”…. um, well, first there is the land, the location, the size, the type, the products used, etc. etc. etc. Naturally various companies and individuals charge differently for what seems like the same things – but in my experience it’s NEVER apples to apples. If you bring me a website quote from another company I am going to look at the entire website checklist and I’m pretty sure there will be differences in what this person is offering verses what I would suggest. For example, sure- a basic website on a WordPress Template might be “cheap” but does that include custom and responsive design, images, content, website architecture, on-page SEO, forms, a custom thank you and 404 error page, installing Google Analytics and Webmaster tools, call tracking, etc. No? Oh. Well, maybe your website quote is cheap for a reason. Good luck with that. Call me when they are done building you your crappy website so I can fix it.

  12. Gabor Por

    This is great. But why are you talking about “views” and “custom content types”, instead of “custom post types”? We are not in Druipal-land any more. :-)

    1. G

      Remember a customer has no knowledge about building a website, so when a customer asks, your response should be it depends and explain it to them.

      Better yet, design a website that has a few input variables that gives a very rough estimate of what price range it will be in.

  13. Christopher Ross

    Brian, this is a great piece. Thanks! I’ve recently updated my online estimate system to use sites based on the breakdown here in your post as I think it’s a lot more intuitive for prospective clients.

    (the estimator itself is a work in progress but hopefully it’ll get there one day)

  14. Liz Jamieson

    Absolutely brilliant. Someone above said they would link to this post. I will go one step further and say that it should be linked to from beneath all our contact forms. Before a prospective client can click submit, they have to also click the check box that says they’ve read it.

  15. Justin McChesney

    Thanks so much for this awesome write up. Really helps me wrap my head around pricing, which is such a tough subject.

    Do you have any tips for getting a budget out of a client?

    1. Jesse Fowler

      To be honest, this is one I hit head on. After an initial meeting with the potential client, I straight out ask them what the budget is that they have in mind. I let them know that I’m aware it’s not an easy question to answer (because who want’s to give a number first right?) but it is very important that I know if they are looking for a $500 site (which will not be me) or if they are willing to spend actual money and have a quality website built. As long as it’s reasonable and I think it fits what they are trying to do, I move forward. It also allows me to scale up or down, include things instead of up charging (for instance ‘great, we can even include 10 hours of SEO to help you write the pages’) which gives them the feel that they just received more for what they were already willing to pay.

  16. Jonathan Silverman

    Fantastic piece Brian. Well done.

  17. Stephen Cronin

    Really well written post Brian, that’s undoubtably going to help many many people.

    I’d like to see more written about getting into the top end of the market. I’ve been on the client side of a CMS project, with 3 websites, that was 7 figures. That went to a business pitching an open source PHP based system (not WordPress, Drupal or Joomla).

    The expectations at that level are very different including, in our case, the need to respond to a tender. No-one pitched WordPress. The company that won spends a lot of time pitching and cultivating relationships, they offer end to end solutions (planning, design, development, hosting, migration, support, training,etc) and they have a large team behind them.

    There aren’t many WordPress businesses operating in this space and I’d like to see more step up to the plate – it’s hard but potentially well worth it!

    1. Joel Warren

      The top end is a lot different to where a lot of people start, or are, like myself. When you’re playing at the top it matters more about strategy and results, and it’s a lot easier to get that right if you have better relationships with the clients and suppliers.

      On smaller jobs and budgets it’s a lot easier to get stuck in the details, but details like what CMS/framework/language you use generally doesn’t matter.

      One person that has started to challenge my thinking is Jose from http://theskoolrocks.com/ – his approach is a lot more on the strategy and client relation side which I think is increasingly important.

  18. Connie

    Bravo. I wish I had this article when I started my business, but I will use it as a reference point from now on when pricing out client projects (and for explaining pricing to prospective clients).

  19. Helge Sverre

    Woah, that was one amazing post, and I now realize that I charge waaay too little.

    Great informal content dude, love it, thank you!

  20. Margarit, WPtailor

    This is probably the best-written article on the subject I can recall.
    Just post it in a big design group and I’m waiting to see the comments.
    Great work!

  21. Jim

    I’ll echo the comments above – this is one of the most comprehensive, well thought out posts on pricing WP projects that I’ve come across. Thanks for sharing!

  22. michael neuvirth

    hi
    I have a startup and am looking for someone to develop my site for me – I understand the pain of having to try and get a proper estimate
    one thing that is missing is a template or guide etc that customers can fill out that helps them define exactly what they want and need from their sites – this would enable customers to provide the developers with the best possible information and this would make the proposal easier to prepare
    If anyone has such a document please post it here – thanks
    michael

  23. Mark

    I’ll echo some of these previous comments and agree that this one of the best and most thorough pieces on the subject. In addition to everything you mentioned, I find myself often forgetting to charge for educating the client on how to use their new website. From backup plugins, to SEO, to commerce, to simple things like “don’t forget to about the Featured Image” section. Really adds up… Thanks again!

  24. Dan

    Wow,

    As a representative of a web agency, I can tell you that this is one of the most thought out and well-written posts I have seen in quite some time. People charge too little all of the time and it stinks to see that!

    Awesome job Brian!

  25. Patty J. Ayers

    Good article, but I think your rates for freelancers are off, both the hourly and per-site rates. I’ve been a full-time web development freelancer for over 15 years and have spent a lot of time writing and counseling and advising freelancers to charge more, for the same reasons and reasoning you give here. But I believe your rates are significantly higher than reality in both those areas, especially in the current economic climate in the U.S. In a recession, and with services like SquareSpace and WordPress.com eliminating millions of potential clients from the pool, it’s hard to get paid a lot. I think I stand my ground and am more determined to be paid well than 9 out of 10 freelancers I talk to, but even I can’t charge the rates you give here.

  26. Ray Gulick

    This is an excellent breakdown. It took me a few years to learn about what you refer to as the “client multiplier,” and it made critical difference in getting paid adequately.

  27. Brin Wilson

    So if a good freelancer will charge $3,000 to $15,000 per website, the next post in the series should be: “How many websites should the average freelancer make in a year to earn a respectable living?” wink wink ;)

  28. Brin Wilson

    P.S. amazing post btw Brian! :)

  29. Tom Townsend

    Having just moved from a free lance role to a newly established Agency, this is Spot-On. The variables are interesting too. We usually factor in 10-20% contingency based on those factors… It’s usage eaten in PM time. Thanks for sharing!

  30. Dave Clements

    I think I’m going to have to make this required reading for all future clients. An excellent breakdown and discussion of why I have to charge what I charge for something that “should be pretty simple”.

  31. Paul Lumsdaine

    BOOM

  32. Asif Amod

    Excellent read,thank you for posting this article,most of my clients should read this.

  33. Adam Zale

    Brilliant!

  34. Wouter-Jan Kok

    Great article!

    Some good points about raising your price at http://chrislema.com/raise-rates/

  35. Carleigh Rochon

    I’ve been building wp sites for four years as a freelancer after working in an agency. I find your insight very accurate and very helpful to have it so well laid out. Thank you for sharing this great tool!

  36. Chad Ostroff

    Brilliant post. Great job.

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  38. David

    Great post. Thank you.

  39. Caleb Mellas

    Brian – Awesome post. Pricing is often the elephant in the room that everyone knows is there, but no one quite knows how to talk about it.

    Speaking from personal experience, I had to come to the point where I realized I was running a professional business, not a hobby shop, and that I couldn’t bill 40 hrs a week, and my taxes were 30% higher that a corporate job. So I knew my rate needed to go up quite a bit.

    The thing is, clients don’t care how much it costs you to run your business. They just want to see results like increased revenue, time saved and business problems solved. Focusing on real-world business results is what will allow you to have happy customers, repeat business and a great income.

    Thanks again Brian!
    – Caleb Mellas

  40. Scott Finlayson

    Awesome post Brian! “I’ve written over 3,000 words and I’m not sure I’ve done it any justice at all.” = the best sentence i’ve read all day.

  41. George Arabian

    Very well articulated and accurate. As an individual running an agency out of Toronto, Canada we run into these scenarios all the time, and in specific the question about cost. The problem we often run into is the general consumer doesn’t quite understand the difference between Custom vs. Theme. Everyone’s heard about WordPress and typically from my findings have been mislead to think you download the software, install a theme and voila, you’re up and running. You’re breakdown and accuracy surrounding efforts involved in customization, planning and project management are perfectly outlined! Great job and thanks again for the contribution to our amazing community!

    Cheers
    – George!

  42. silvia

    Definitely one of the most spot on pricing articles I’ve read. Well done. I’ve been in both the Agency and Freelance pricing worlds and both require the the Client Multiplier or (PIA charge. Pain in the A@$ Charge). If you don’t factor that in any amount of ‘profit’ will get sucked right up.

    One thing I have found that is really helpful it to estimate with a range. I range allows for PIA, slush, overages, creative blocks, (some) feature creep etc. If you are upfront with that the client is usually very forgiving.

    When a client balks at a quoted hourly rate (ex. $125 – 175) I usually ask them, “What do you pay your plumber? Your auto mechanic?”. In the Bay Area those guys are $85 – 125 per hour so that usually helps put it into perspective.

    I also can’t agree more to the comments about charging what it’s worth. Freelancers and agencies that underbid only do a disservice to the entire industry.

  43. Tim

    Will send my clients here :) tx!

  44. Mathew Porter

    Great article, as a small agency owner its a constant battle to gauge each project, but we always refer back to how much time we think a project will take from all the data we can get from a client including their analytics data, their requirements, their current site, and requirements we know that they will need based on what they give / tell us.

    Always add a small cushion on pricing to, as you mentioned their is nothing worse than something taking a lot longer than you anticipated and not getting paid for it.

    Also always outline all specifics in a proposal, that way, anything out side of the project scope, you can charge additionally to the client and have a point of reference if they argue it was initially outlined.

    One final thing… Know what you produce, your place in the market and when to turn away potential business that doesn’t fit in to this.

  45. michael neuvirth

    from the customer side – does anyone have a template or similar that they send to clients to help the client define the exact project, functions etc
    I think this would be a great way to make sure there is a meeting of the minds and that each side knows what to expect
    thanks

  46. Robin

    Great article.
    Definitely gives me some tips on quoting and how to present myself to client.

  47. Alicia

    You know there’s clearly been a lot of thought gone into this post and it really is an excellent point of reference but I ultimately think it’s off beam.

    I would make 2 points:

    Firstly the 18-30 crowd are pretty much computer savvy in a way that not all the 18-30 crowd from a generation ago were not. This means that the typical 25 year old thinks they can and probably could make a decent fist of putting a website together themselves. Sure they may need to hire someone to round off the edges but they’re not having to get someone onboard from start to finish.

    They just go buy a theme they like, set up and away they go.

    Secondly, there’s the foreign market. Why pay top dollar to an agency in New York who have huge overheads and secretarial support or even a freelance who has a huge rent bill to pay when you can contract a guy out in India or the Philippines to make one for you at a daily rate of $1.50.

    The web design business has become nothing more than a race to the bottom, if you can still pull in clients dumb enough to pay $3000 or more for a website then good luck to you, enjoy it while it lasts – because it won’t.

    1. Kelly

      I have fixed many a website that someone thought they could outsource overseas. People only need to learn that lesson once. And while you are right that a lot of people (even those over 30) can put up their first website themselves, those aren’t the clients a freelancer should be going after. A serious business owner is going to hire a professional web designer at the point where their business can afford it and they understand the high-value role that a website can play in their business. That is the client a freelancer should be going after. You are exactly right, although not in the way you intended. A freelancer who is going after the clients you described isn’t going to be a freelancer for very long.

      1. Dan Knauss (@newlocalmedia)

        Age has nothing to do with anyone’s ability to put together “a website” or to be “computer savvy” in ways that are relevant to the needs of a particular project.

    2. Jesse Fowler

      I respectfully disagree on many points. One sentence almost always comes up during a discussion with the potential client. “You’re good at what you do, and I’m good at what I do. I won’t try to do your job if you allow me to do mine”. Now clearly I say it in a friendly way, but basically, I let them know that they are in good hands and I respect that they are probably great at their job, so I expect the same respect from them. This being said, when a client says they can do it themselves, I say go for it, and let me know when you are done and ready for a real site (again, paraphrasing, I’m not an egotistical ass). Usually they don’t like what they put together or more likely, don’t have the time as they are trying to work all the time. Who has time to make a site, heck they can’t usually get me the content!

      As for the 1.50 per day in the Philippines, tell me who you are using?! I pay my designer in the Philippines quite well, making more like $100 per day. You get what you pay for and if you’re paying $1.50 per day, you will not get the dedication, devotion and professionalism that is required.

      That being said – clients like dealing with someone near them – or at least in the country. They feel secure about that. If my designer decides to take off, that’s my issue and I better resolve it before they come to my house and threaten me. They can’t do that if their designer is in the Philippines. They are aware (as I’m open about it) that my employees are all over the world, but they know that I am available almost 16 hours a day and only a few miles away most of the time.

  48. Nate Wright

    I think there’s a big difference between selling “a website” as you describe it and developing a business solution for a company’s online presence. If a client’s main goal is to “have a website”, it’s my job to shift the conversation to things that matter more — how will a website contribute to your business development, what matters to your market (so we can drive conversions) and where do you want to be in 3-5 years.

    An overseas agency or cut-rate local developer will never take the time to understand a local business’s customer base and use that to craft a solid business solution. In my experience, small business owners (and even non-profit orgs) almost always grasp the significance of business-related metrics immediately. Most of them already have under-performing websites. They’re taking another stab at their website because they want to invest in something better.

    If all they know they’re buying is the CMS and a theme, it makes sense that they’d balk at paying $3000. But for small businesses, if their website can drive steady income their way, $3000 is not a big investment.

  49. Dan Knauss (@newlocalmedia)

    Nah. The cheap solutions lack the language, writing, marketing, sales, client handling, and support skills and capacities to turn out good work and long-term satisfied clients. What they do is provide “good enough” solutions for cheap clients who may eventually be able to spend for quality.

    1. Alicia

      Nate said, “An overseas agency or cut-rate local developer will never take the time to understand a local business’s customer base and use that to craft a solid business solution.”

      I understand the point you’re making but I don’t necessarily agree. What makes you think an overseas developer or the local guy is going to care or understand less about his customer than one elsewhere?

      It’s all relative of course, that cut-throat local developer may not be making the stellar bucks that some other guys are making but he still has his reputation to consider and if they’re not producing websites that convert then they’re going to suffer long term for it.

      I’m aware of plenty of really excellent, attentive web developers and craftsmen who would baulk at charging their clients $3000 and upwards but who to a person would do an equally impressive job for any of them.

      In short, charging more sometimes just means charging more. If you think the developer from Asia who is charging 20% of your rate isn’t a threat to you then you’re already in trouble.

  50. Dan Knauss (@newlocalmedia)

    Nate is exactly right. Excellent, attentive developers who charge less than $3000 to “build a site” may exist, but they’re wasting their skills. They’d provide more value and get paid better as freelancers if they learned to cover a few more bases beyond coding and design, or if they joined a team that complements them well in delivering long-term business solutions. In ten years I have only seen prices and value go up for those solutions, not down, and there has been no complaining about it.

    Nobody’s market is jeopardized by cheap offshore developers unless their clientele is people who only look at price and think they just need a “developer.” This is a mistake those buyers will learn from when they realize it’s hard to communicate with developers even if they’re local and speak the same language fluently. Just getting a project articulated properly in its specifications, scope and contract is half the battle. Coding mills in Bangladesh don’t do this. They also can’t deal with existing applications where data security and trust are key. I have done work for people who learned the hard way that giving root access to people half a world away is a bad idea, and if it just results in crappy, broken code you are lucky.

    I get contacts daily from Asian developers who want me to farm work out for them. If they are such a threat, why don’t they just talk directly to North American markets? When they are able to do that, things will change, but I don’t see it working out for them without good domestic partnerships.

  51. Kolleen Powers

    I think it comes down to figuring out what the market will pay for your skill level. I’ve been designing websites for 16 years and in WordPress for three. For the past year I have ranked in the number one spot on page one of Google in my city for web design and I get a lot of calls. The more work I take in, the more I raise my prices. The work keeps coming.

    At some point, I will top out at what the market is willing to pay. This will be when I get less than 50% of the jobs I send estimates to. This is the price I will be comfortable staying at.

  52. Jonathan

    Hi there!

    I love this article and the way you brought about a subject that is often taboo for certain clients: Money!

    That said, I think I would of covered a little more the agency side of different web solutions. Although a solo worker can be good at many things, he can’t be an expert in everything. Agencies tend to have different experts. Giving you some quality no matter the aspect (design, programming, marketing, seo, etc.) of your project.

    I’ve never seen a solo worker be able to excel at every aspect of a web presence. That is also something to think about. Having to manage many different resources to obtain the same quality of work :)

  53. Joshua Patterson

    Thank you so much for posting this, I will be sure to share this with my clients who so often say “but it’s just wordpress”

  54. Anthony Hortin

    Great article Brian! Really well thought out and extremely thorough. There’s definitely a number of points you’ve made that are making me rethink how I approach proposals, from now on. Thanks!

  55. Tracy Bradley

    Wow, Brian – that was the most thorough, well-thought out post I’ve read on pricing so far. Completely agree with your client multipliers. I’ve learned over time that some clients need more managing than others… and that I need to start working that out ahead of time so I can charge accordingly.

    Really like your breakdown of unique views and of content. That’s an approach I’m going to take from now on. Thanks!

  56. Andre Liem

    Agree, wow, this is one brilliant article on estimation and WordPress. Rates are pretty accurate from my experience working in an agency and as a freelancer in the North West. If there was ever a document which could help bring some more education and price control to the web design/dev industry, this would be it. There is so much variation days and confusion on pricing that it can baffle the confidence in both the clients and companies pitching. e.g. – the scenarios where you get variance of more than 10x between the lowest and highest bidder.

    Thanks

  57. Katie Keith

    A fantastically well thought out post, thanks very much! It’s lovely to read a post by someone who has such a detailed understanding of all the factors that come into play on a WordPress web design project, I have had very similar experiences. I love the following paragraph and agree 100%!

    “Yes, custom design costs more than pre-built themes — until you try to add functionality to or modify the way something works in a template. Then you want to cry and run into a hole and pity yourself for having charged less money for using a pre-built theme.”

  58. Rj

    You nailed it brother. I’ve been building wp sites for a year. This is really helpful.

  59. Brent Carnduff

    Interesting article. Love the client multiplier!!

  60. Mike

    Great article with excellent details. I’ve shared it within my own company as it provides several good talking points.

    I know this is focused primarily on WordPress website design, but I would reiterate others’ comments that a full-fledged agency can provide benefit in the form of long-term business services that incorporate overall strategy and marketing principles, even when it isn’t a “huge” project. A holistic approach can help ensure the website is not “on an island” and provide the most benefit. I’ve seen several times where it’s difficult for one person to take that many viewpoints into consideration.

    Freelancers can of course partner with other independent contractors, but at the risk of individuals with differing values and goals. A team in an agency (usually) is on the same page and can offer the client a big picture.

  61. pomy

    Great post. I usually cost $1000 to $1500 for a static website. And yes, and agreed here that it varies on different projects.

  62. Dennis Schmets

    Very good and comprehensive article, also thanks for the contributions to wordpress 4.0.

  63. Jeff

    Fantastic and very exciting to study this content. I would like to thank you for the efforts you had made for writing this awesome article.

  64. Mike

    This is a difficult topic to summarize but you did a great job. One thing I have learned over the last few years is how to judge clients and projected time. You get a good idea after doing a number of wordpress projects how long each may take based on the client and content. I think to myself what should I be making in this time frame based on my experience and previous salaries.

    The other variable which has almost doubled my rate over the last few years is the above and beyond steps you should be taking to optimize their site. A site I spent 20 hours on 4 years ago I spend 40 on now just based on all the things above the design. Keyword research and content writing, SEO, consistently optimizing plugins like WP SEO, Google implementation, directory consistency, etc. This is all time consuming stuff I did not do years ago.

    One thing I do not agree with though is the rate structure most people associate with agencies vs. freelancers. I always thought if I am providing lets say level 4 design and seo as a freelancer, why should an agency make more who has a level 2 designer doing the project. I always felt you should charge what you are worth, regardless if you work in your parents basement as a freelancer, or your an agency with a $4000/mo oceanfront office lease.

  65. carol lieb

    Excellent article and commentary. A website that is part of a business solution is incredibly valuable.

  66. Scott Michelson

    Great article. Thank you for taking the time to put all that in an article. Very useful!

  67. Eric Burnett

    Thank you so much, Brian! This post was very helpful. Thanks for all of the hard work you put into this article!

  68. Edinburgh Web Designers

    It’s great to hear I’m not the only one who really struggles to avoid giving discounts to clients for various reasons.

    This article could well become the pricing bible to help keep freelancers like me from making huge pricing mistakes for new projects.

    I really like the pricing structure based on the number of views, that should help with communication too to make it clear what is going to cost extra and why.

  69. John Bolyard

    Yes – “pricing is hard”. Thanks for putting this together. I like the pricing based on view also. I never have thought of that – excellent!

  70. Brandon Yanofsky

    Hi Brian

    And thank you so much for this article. Amazing.

    I’m curious in regards to the 50% billable time. Does that have an effect on project costs? For instance, if a consultant has a higher billable time, do they usually charge more because projects get done faster?

    Or is that simply a rate to give us an average idea of timelines?

    Thank you for your reply, and of course, for this article.

  71. JP

    “The freelancer you work with will probably utilize a team of other subcontractors in this scenario, because it’s rare for someone to truly deliver all the things you need running solo.”

    As someone who would be considered a rarity based on this comment it’s unfortunate that some clients share that sentiment, in that no one person would be able to deliver all the things they’d need, especially those clients whose projected investment would be in the $5000 to $15000 range. I’ve taken clients away from local agencies whose knowledge of the services they were offering and subsequent deliverables did not justify what the clients were paying.

  72. Peter parker

    According to me no one can calculate the exact cost of word press websites because it depend on functionality of your website. You can calculate the approximate cost of websites.

  73. JR Brown

    Fantastic article and I’m thoroughly confused – which is a good thing. I’m looking to take on building a website for my startup business, and the more I read, the more I realize how vague things are – price to charge being one them.

    Thanks again for this. I’ll be reading it a couple times more to make sure I’m less and less confused :)

    JB

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